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  • Kabocha Squash

    Jan 30, 2019

    This squash, also referred to as a Japanese pumpkin or a Japanese squash, has many diverse uses and it'll soon become one of your favorites.

    Appearance & Flavor
    This small to medium-sized winter squash will range in weight from as light as one pound to as much as eight. They are round, yet squatty since both the top and bottom are somewhat flat, with a short brown stem. The dark green grooved rind has light green specks with pale stripes. The deep orange-yellow flesh is thick, dense, and almost sponge-like. The center cavity houses stringy pulp with many flat off-white seeds. These seeds are edible, and you can roast them just like pumpkin seeds. Make sure to choose kabochas that are not moldy, scarred, and soft.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Ever tried vegetable tempura? This one uses a kabocha squash. Use them to make soups, stews, pastas, curries, breads, desserts, and sauces. You can also eat them solo if you roast, steam, bake, or sauté them. Like we said: very diverse.

    Availability & Origin
    This variety is available year-round but it's peak seasons are the fall and winter. Kabochas are grown primarily in California and some in the Northwest.

    Storage
    Kabochas can last up to three months if you store them in a cool, dry place. After cutting, they'll keep for up to five days as long as they're wrapped in plastic

  • Clementines

    Jan 30, 2019

    Clementines have reached a level of popularity over others in the mandarin orange family for being fairly new on the scene. They became commercially available in the 1990s.

    Appearance & Flavor
    Clementines are small, round, smooth, and wrapped in a deep orange rind. Just like a regular orange, only smaller. They have essential oils and release a strong citrus smell when punctured or zested. They peel easily and have a sweet flavor, which is why they are hit with the kiddos and plenty of adults too. 

    Ways to Enjoy
    We're swooning over these cute cookies-they're perfect for your holiday gathering. 
    Most popularly, people eat them just as they are. But they make a great addition to desserts, salads, cocktails, and vinaigrettes. Try garnishing or zesting a dish with a clementine peel.

    Availability & Origin
    This mandarin variety is available from November and into January. They mainly grow in California. 

    Storage
    You can leave them out on the counter for about two days but avoid direct sunlight. If they come in a mesh bag, then keep them in the bag and keep them in the crisper drawer. They'll last a couple weeks but keep an eye on them and trash the ones that get soft since they'll spoil the rest. After two weeks, you should discard them because they're considered old at that point. A side note: don't place in an air-tight container or plastic bag (unless they're peeled) since it will speed up the decay process.

  • Delicata Squash

    Dec 06, 2018

    This winter squash hails from a different season, but is still a  member of the summer squash family-others including zucchinis and patty pans.

    Appearance & Flavor
    These small to medium-sized squashes are narrow and long with grooved skin. The skin is thin and smooth with a whiteish yellow base, and you may see green or orange stripes. The orange-yellow colored flesh is thick and firm. The hollow center houses a stringy pulp in which you'll find hard, flat seeds. Delicatas taste similar to sweet potatoes when their cooked. Chose squashes that are heavy and firm-with no wrinkles or soft spots in sight.

    Ways to Enjoy
    If you are a pizza lover searching for a healthier alternative,  consider making your own delicata pizza!  They have such a thin skin that you can leave it on while you're preparing it. Try baking, boiling, roasting, and sautéing your delicatas. They hold their shape throughout the cooking process, so they would work well stuffed. Or, toss them into all sorts of pastas, soups, and salads.

    Availability & Origin
    Available from fall to early winter, delicatas are primarily grown in California, though some are produced in the Northwest.

    Storage
    When whole, they can be stored for several months in a cool, dark  place. After being cut, however, they will last about a week in an air-tight container.

  • Easter Egg Radishes

    Dec 06, 2018

    Easter egg radishes are the most colorful radish variety. On Easter or any other day of the year, these radishes can brighten any dish you add them to.

    Appearance & Flavor
    Easter egg radishes are small and round and in each colorful bunch, you'll find white, pink, purple, and crimson bulbs. Their flesh is bright white regardless of the exterior skin color. Their taproots are wire-like and they are crisp with a mild radish flavor. Despite all their colors, brown spots should not be one of them. Chose radishes with a smooth skin, but not soft. Also make sure they are heavy for their size.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Bring some color to the Thanksgiving table with this side. Fresh or cooked, they are sure to enhance your salads, sandwiches, soups, stir fries or tacos. If you choose to roast them, their sweetness will really come out.

    Availability & Origin
    They are grown year-round in many parts of the United States, though they peak in the spring up until the late fall.

    Storage
    If you purchase your Easter egg radishes in a bag, inspect the bag to ensure its free of mold. If they still have their tops, cut them off completely with scissors since they can draw the moisture out of the bulb. For 10 days of use, place them in a plastic bag slightly closed but not air-tight in the fridge's crisper drawer. If they are sliced, store in an air-tight container in the fridge and you should get up to five days.

  • Autumn Royal Grapes

    Dec 06, 2018

    This striking dessert grape is new on the grape scene. The variety is only a little more than 20 years old.

    Appearance & Flavor
    These elongated grapes are large in size. Their skin is firm, waxy, and can range in color from purple-black to black, which makes their green-yellow flesh surprising. They are seedless besides a random seed here or there. They are soft, highly succulent grapes that have a strong, spicy, sweet flavor. Avoid moldy, shriveled, or discolored ones, or those detached from their stem.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Most popularly eaten raw, but you can toss them in a fruit or regular salad, desserts, drinks, jams, and jellies. They can even be frozen and used as a quick snack or as ice cubes in your drink. If you have a gluten sensitivity or simply love pancakes, check this out. 

    Availability & Origin
    They have a very short season; California grows them from October to November. Did you know that California's San Joaquin Valley produces 99 percent of the grapes the United States consumes?

    Storage
    Get them in the fridge as soon as possible in their original bag or container, since those are the best ventilated to protect them. Place in the back part of the fridge-which is the coldest. Keep them away from foods with strong odors as they can absorb the smell. Also, make sure not put anything on top or up against them since they bruise easily. Lastly, do not wash until you're ready to use them because water starts the breakdown process. They'll last 10 days in the fridge, but after they're cut or peeled, they'll be good for about two days refrigerated in an air-tight container. They will keep for about two months, however, if you freeze them.

  • Forelle Pears

    Dec 06, 2018

    Here's a quick German lesson: the German word "Forelle" means "trout." This pear is said to be named after the rainbow trout. After all, the pear's skin is similar to the fish's scales. 

    Appearance & Flavor
    Forelles are small, dense, bell-shaped pears that are green with a few deep red spots when they're unripe, but as they mature, those spots become more predominant and the skin turns yellow. The juicy and crisp flesh is aromatic and colored white or cream. Its flavor is spicy but sweet-almost like candy. Avoid bruised, punctured or soft pears.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Due to their size, people rarely bake them, but why bake them when you can make these simple fritters instead? Most popularly eaten raw, slices of these pears go great in salads, soups, and as part of a cheese plate. Their striking color makes them a good centerpiece for holiday dinners. Psst: like for Thanksgiving which is coming up.

    Availability & Origin
    Forelle pears are available from March to December; Chile provides the fruit from March to August and then the Pacific Northwest takes over production for September to December.

    Storage
    You can store unripe pears in the coldest part of the fridge for several weeks. But ripe ones will only last about three days. After slicing, they can be stored in an air-tight container or bag in the back of the fridge and will keep for about two days.

  • Princess Grapes

    Dec 06, 2018

    This regal grape did not actually start off as royalty... The princess grape was given that name after a copyright issue with its original name.

    Appearance & Flavor
    These smooth, shiny, light green grapes grow from medium to large in size. Their seedless flesh is an even lighter green. Princess grapes have a good crunch to them and produce a sweet tart flavor. The best grapes stay attached to their stem and are free of mold, shriveling, and discoloration.

    Ways to Enjoy
    It's almost Halloween! How about a mini spin on the traditional caramel apple; caramel grapes. Though they are most popular in their raw form, they can be used in green salads and fruit salads, plus smoothies, relishes, and compotes. Or try freezing them and tossing a few in your drink like ice cubes.

    Availability & Origin
    The princess grape season seems to go by in the blink of an eye. From July to November, they're found growing in California. In fact, California's San Joaquin Valley produces 99 percent of the grapes consumed in the US.

    Storage
    Princess grapes can be very sensitive. Remember these few things to keep them in the best condition:

    - Put them in the fridge as soon as possible

    - Leave them in their original bag or container-it's the best ventilated to protect them.

    - Place in the back of the fridge (the coldest part).

    - Keep separate from foods with strong odor. They can absorb the smell.

    - They bruise easily so make sure to not place anything on top of them.

    - Do not wash the grapes until you are ready to use them. Water starts the breakdown process.

    They will last about 10 days in the fridge. If you have cut or peeled them, you can store in an air-tight container or bag for about two days of use. When properly frozen, they can last up to two months.


  • Jazz Apples

    Dec 06, 2018

    Talk about exclusive! The jazz apple, a cross between a Royal Gala and Braeburn, is trademarked and only those who possess a license are allowed to grow it. 

    Appearance & Flavor
    This is one of the harder apple varieties, yet it is very crisp and juicy. The skin has swirls of deep red over a green, yellow, and orange base. The flesh is a light yellow and tastes sweet and tart with a pear-flavored undertone. Select those that are free from blemishes, nicks, soft spots, and dull color.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Ever wonder where 'sweet' and 'heat' meet? In this chili, of course. It seems as though the two favorite ways people enjoy jazz apples are eating them as is and baking them. Try them out in pies, cakes, muffins, breads, salads, or stuff them. 

    Availability & Origin
    Jazz apples, the special blend which originated in New Zealand, are available year-round. They come to us, however, from Washington state from October to April. Between March and September, they are produced in Chile and New Zealand.

    Storage
    Place in your crisper drawer or in an uncovered container or bowl in the back of the fridge (yep, the coldest spot). They will keep for a few months. When stored at room temperature in a fruit bowl or on the counter, you will get about three days or so of use.

  • Ambrosia Apples

    Oct 12, 2018

    Ambrosia apples are 'the food of the Gods' since their name comes from Greek mythology. Assumed as a cross between a golden delicious and a starking delicious, these apples, as you may have guessed, are said to have a 'heavenly' taste.

    Appearance & Flavor
    And what we mean by 'heavenly' is tender, juicy, and crisp flesh with a sweet, honey-like overtone. The flesh of these medium to large-sized apples can range from pale to a cream yellow, but their smooth and shiny skin is generally golden yellow with pink and red blushing. When selecting, choose apples that are solid and heavy for their size and avoid the ones with soft or dark spots.

    Ways to Enjoy
    It's baking season! And we're craving desserts like this one. Ambrosias are perfect for salads, sandwiches, pies, tarts, doughnuts, muffins, soups, and rice, or just on their own. Talk about a versatile fruit. 

    Availability & Origin
    Ambrosias grow between October and February from Canada, their native country. Then we get them from Chile and New Zealand from May to Mid-August.

    Storage
    Place unwashed apples in the crisper drawer, or if you don't have one, placing them in an uncovered bowl in the back of the fridge-aka the coldest spot-will do just fine. They will last a few months. When stored at room temperature on the counter, you'll get about three days or so of use.

  • Baby Eggplant

    Oct 12, 2018

    The baby eggplant may be small, but they are just as hearty as their adult counterpart in the nightshade family.

    Appearance & Flavor
    Depending on variety, they can be short and squatty or narrow and elongated. Their colors can also range from shiny dark purple to a lighter lavender with white striping, or even green. Be careful, as their skin is delicate and can bruise easily. Their cap should be bright green. The off-white, tender, and sweet-tasting flesh is consistent across different varieties. Chose eggplants that are firm, heavy for their size, and have a smooth, bright-colored skin free of scarring and bruises. To put their ripeness to the test, gently press with your thumb and it should bounce back.

    Ways to Enjoy
    This stuffed eggplant recipe makes for a great side dish. Eggplants are often used as a great substitute for vegetarians and vegans alike. Fried, braised, grilled, roasted-you can't go wrong.

    Availability & Origin
    Available year-round, the baby eggplant is native to China and India. New Jersey actually grows more than 65 percent of the world's eggplant supply. They also grow in California and Mexico.

    Storage
    For up to two days of use, store it whole, unwashed, at room temperature, and out of direct sunlight. For up to five days, store it whole, unwashed, and in a container or perforated plastic bag in the crisper drawer. If your baby eggplant comes wrapped in plastic already, remove the wrapper as soon as possible because plastic accelerates the breakdown process. Keep them a distance away from any ethylene-producing fruits like apples and potatoes-that speeds up the decay process as well. After cutting the eggplant, the slices will brown easily. Follow this process and you'll get about three days out them. 

  • Asian Pears

    Oct 12, 2018

    Fun fact: this fruit first came to the United States when Chinese miners planted their seeds during the Gold Rush days. They are also known as apple pears since they have physical traits of both fruits.

    Appearance & Flavor
    There are about 10 varieties of Asian pears. Depending on the variety, their skin will range in color from green to yellow and brown. Some have russeting (brown spots), which is completely normal. Their white flesh can be described as juicy, sweet, crisp, and fragrant. When picking them out, they should be firm, but don't squeeze too hard-they have delicate skin and can bruise easily.

    Ways to Enjoy
    The next time you're craving a sweet heat, try making this coleslaw.  You can't beat the flavor of the raw Asian pear, but you can also sauté them and toss them into salads, sauces, or desserts. Or if you feel like experimenting, use them in any recipe that calls for an apple.

    Availability & Origin
    As the name indicates, Asian pears are native to China and Japan. Now, the US gets its Asian pears from California and Oregon between July and January and from Chile from February to June.

    Storage
    When whole, you can keep them out on the counter for up to 10 days. In the fridge, they can last up to two months. After you cut them, they'll be good for about two days in the fridge in an air-tight container before they begin to brown.


  • English Cucumbers

    Oct 12, 2018

    As the most popular cucumber type worldwide, they come with a couple nicknames, such as 'Hothouse' or the seedless variety. They can even grow to almost two feet in length.

    Appearance & Flavor
    They differ from a regular cucumber-or a slicer-since they have edible skin and less seeds that aren't bitter. Their skin is also thinner than that of a normal cucumber, and their shape is narrower. With flesh ranging from pale green to opaque white, pick out those that are firm, show no blemishes, and no signs of mold.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Try this recipe; it's the perfect addition to your last summer  barbecue. Enjoyed raw or cooked in salads, dips, sandwiches, soups, and sushi. You can even puree and pickle them.

    Availability & Origin
    English Cucumbers are available all year long. Originally native to Central Asia, you'll now find them growing in Europe, Canada, Mexico, and all over the US.

    Storage
    When whole, make sure to rinse and dry it. Wrap the cucumber in a dish towel or paper towel and then in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer. The bag should not contain much air but leave the top open. That will last you up to five days. If you only use part of the cucumber, cover the cut part with plastic wrap and follow the same storage directions for the whole cucumber. If you have cut pieces left, submerge the slices in water in an open container or soak the paper towels wrapping them and place them in crisper. Both ways will get you up to five days' worth of use.

  • Elephant Garlic

    Sep 19, 2018

    Attention garlic lovers! Did you know that elephant garlic is the largest in the garlic family and is also close to the leek family? They can weigh up to a pound and contain five cloves on average.

    Appearance & Flavor 
    They've got thin skin, and their color can range from white to yellow. The cloves have a tint of yellow. Their taste is more mild and sweet than your typical garlic. Even though it is garlic, it's flavor is said to have only a hint of garlic, but mostly taste like part onion and part leek.

    Ways to Enjoy 
    Are you sick of the same old potato chip? You can make these crisps yourself instead. Raw or cooked, they taste great-or try them roasted, baked, or grilled in salad, pasta, or in a dip or spread.

    Availability & Origin 
    We get elephant garlic from California 90 percent of the time while the other 10 percent it comes from Argentina, China (their country of origin), and Mexico. That's right-they're yours all year long.

    Storage 
    When whole and unpeeled, store your elephant garlic in a cool, dry, dark place for up to a few months. After peeling or chopping them, you can store the pieces in the fridge in an air-tight container, yet you will want to use them within a day or so to avoid them losing flavor.

  • Ginger Root

    Sep 19, 2018

    Ginger root may look alien-like to you, but it turns out this root has been around even longer than you and I have-ginger root can be tracked back approximately five thousand years.

    Appearance & Flavor 
    The skin varies along a range of tan and has rings, though its firm flesh is an off-yellow color. The skin's thickness depends on when it was harvested; the thinner the skin, the less mature the root. Its aroma is strong with spicy overtones. Unsure of which ginger is the best? We've got you covered. Look for the roots that are smooth, firm, and heavy for their size. Avoid soft, wrinkled, or moldy ones.

    Ways to Enjoy 
    Have a fall gathering coming up? We found a recipe for a mean pork tenderloin that you should try out. Outside of the fall parties, you can use ginger raw or in juice, smoothies, teas, sauces, soups, salads, stir fires, and desserts.

    Availability & Origin
    Ginger root is available year-round from our top producers; China, Indonesia, and India. Those three countries cover 98 percent of the US supply. Hawaii provides the remaining two. Ginger is native to Southeast Asia.

    Storage 
    For whole and unpeeled ginger root, store in an air-tight plastic bag in your fridge's crisper drawer and it'll last about three weeks. After that root is partially cut, you'll need to dry the cut end and continue to store it the same way for the same amount of time. If it is entirely peeled, that'll cut its shelf life in half using the same storage method described above.

  • Escarole

    Sep 19, 2018

    Widely used in Italian-American foods, this lettuce variety dates to ancient Roman times.

    Appearance & Flavor 
    Escarole leaves are crunchy, crisp, and wide with a slight curl. The outer leaves are dark green, but the closer to the center you get, the lighter green they become. They taste bitter and have a nutty undertone. The darker the leaf, the more bitter the flavor. Make sure to choose one with a firm head and tight leaves-with no discoloration or mushy feeling.

    Ways to Enjoy 
    You'll feel like quite the chef as you bring out the nutty undertones of the escarole with this recipe. If you want to go the path of less effort, it works well raw in salads,  sandwiches, and lettuce wraps. However, cooking escarole can reduce its bitterness. Try adding it to stir fries, soups, and stews, or on its own braised or sautéed.

    Availability & Origin
    Though the peak seasons are spring and summer, you can still get escarole all year long. They were native to the East Indies, but now 90 percent of the Unites States' supply is grown in Salinas, California from March to November and then in Yuma, Arizona from November to March.

    Storage 
    For a whole head, do not rinse it, but wrap it in paper towels and store in an unsealed bag in the crisper drawer for up to four days. Uncooked and unwashed leaves can be stored in a perforated bag in the crisper for about three days. After being cooked, store them in an air-tight container in the fridge to get two days tops out of them.

  • Hatch Chiles

    Sep 19, 2018

    It's that time of year again: hatch chile time! They are only available for a short time so grab them while you can. 

    Appearance & Flavor
    Hatch chiles have their bright green and shiny flesh. When choosing your chiles, pick those that are heavy for their size, have medium-firm skin, are bright in color, have smooth skin, and, of course, not misshapen.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Kick your summer salad up a few notches with this recipe. Or try making the infamous chile relleno dish. Roasted is their claim to fame, but they are also great in soups, salads, sandwiches, dips, and salsas.

    Availability & Origin 
    Originally from Hatch, New Mexico, these chiles grow in the Hatch Valley, stretching along the Rio Grande. Other 'hatch' chiles grow in Colorado, Arizona, Mexico, and even China, but they cannot carry the true hatch name unless they come from the Valley. They typically start growing from mid-August until mid-September.

    Storage 
    Store unprepared chiles unwashed in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to five days of use. After being roasted, you have many storage options in order to enjoy them past their short season. 

  • Red Radishes

    Sep 19, 2018

    There are dozens of varieties of this taproot. The most popular and readily available among these is the red radish.

    Appearance & Flavor
    Radishes can come with or without their thin edible leaves. The bulbs themselves are a deep red and can be up to three inches in diameter. The flesh is crisp that is an opaque white. Their texture is like watercress with a peppery finish. The best ones are small to medium in size similar to that of a ping pong ball. Avoid ones that have blemishes, cracks, and wrinkles and the leaves should not be wilted or brown.

    Ways to Enjoy
    What could make radishes better? Bacon of course! Here's a great recipe for a side dish. They can also be eaten raw, roasted, braised, grilled, and pickled. Toss them in your tacos, pastas, sandwiches, and pizza. 

    Availability & Origin
    Red radishes are available year-round. In the US, they grow mostly in Texas and California. Beyond the US, Japan and China are large producers.

    Storage
    If you're purchasing a bag of radishes, inspect the bag to ensure it's free of mold. If the radishes still have their tops, cut them off completely with scissors since the tops can draw the moisture from the bulb. Then store them in a plastic bag slightly closed but not air-tight in your fridge's crisper drawer. They should last up to 10 days. After slicing, store those slices in an air-tight container in the fridge for up to five days. 

  • Red Bell Peppers

    Aug 15, 2018

    You know the red bell pepper as a vegetable, but technically it's a fruit since it has flowers. Did you know that red bells are just green bell peppers, but at the ripest stage of their life?

    Appearance & Flavor
    Red inside and out. The outside should be glossy and Smooth-glossiness indicates the pepper's ripeness. Inside, you'll find edible, bitter seeds and a sponge-like core. During the spring and fall, they are mild and sweet, but in the summer and winter, they take on a slight peppery flavor along with their sweetness. Choose bells that are deep in color, give slightly to pressure, feel heavy for their size, and have no bruises, scars, or soft spots. 

    Ways to Enjoy
    Dress up your typical salad with a vinaigrette that is anything but typical. Other familiar options include raw, cooked, roasted, pickled, pureed, and stuffed.

    Availability & Origin
    Red bells are available all year long since they are sourced from different countries. During the summer months, we get them right from California. For the winter, they grow best in Mexico. In the spring and fall, they fly in from Holland.

    Storage
    When ripe, you'll want to put them in the fridge as soon as possible. Since they need to stay hydrated, keep them whole in the crisper drawer near a wet cloth for a week-or 10 days if you're lucky. If you bring home one that's not yet ripe, you can store them at about 70 degrees and they will ripen within the span of two weeks. If they are cooked, store in an air-tight container in the fridge for about three days of good leftovers.


  • Iceberg Babies

    Aug 15, 2018

    Inspired by the demand for pre-packaged lettuce mixes, iceberg lettuce farmers created the iceberg baby by harvesting iceberg lettuce at a younger age. 

    Appearance & Flavor
    As far as appearances go, imagine an iceberg lettuce head, but about the size of a softball. The thick leaves are tightly bound together. The outer leaves are green, and the inner leaves range from a pale yellow to an opaque white. Since they have more water than most greens, they are crunchy and moist. Here's the check list you'll want to keep in mind when picking them out: fresh outer leaves, compact inner leaves, and no wilting or discoloration.

    Ways to Enjoy
    If you're a ceviche fan, take a look at this recipe-perfect for a light lunch or an appetizer. Being ideal for the wedge salad is their claim to fame, but just like regular iceberg lettuce, iceberg babies are perfect for many other salad blends. Try them as lettuce wraps or as a cup for other ingredients.

    Availability & Origin
    You can get these babies year-round. From November to March, they grow in Arizona and from April to October, California produces them.

    Storage
    Whole heads can last about five days in the fridge in a plastic bag. After being cut, they will last almost a week in an air-tight bag or container.

  • Orange and Yellow Bell Peppers

    Aug 15, 2018

    The color of bell peppers vary, but let's take a closer look at the orange and yellow varieties.

    Appearance & Flavor 
    Orange and yellow bells have insides to match their outsides. The exterior should be glossy and smooth. Did you know glossiness indicates ripeness? Inside, you'll find bitter edible seeds and a spongy core. Since we get our bell peppers from different locations during different seasons, the flavor changes slightly. In summer and winter, you'll find they are mild and sweet. During spring and fall, they're still mild and sweet, yet a tad peppery. Choose bells that are deep in color with no bruises, scars, or soft spots. They should give a little to light pressure and should feel heavy for their size.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Need a hearty breakfast? Start your day with one of these. For those of you who aren't morning people, here's a treat for dinner time. Otherwise, you can't go wrong with raw, cooked, roasted, pickled, pureed, or stuffed bell peppers.

    Availability & Origin
    These bells are available year-round. During the summer, they come from California. For the spring and fall, they are flown in from Holland. And in wintertime, Mexico is the main producer.

    Storage
    If they're ripe, get them in fridge as soon as possible. They need to stay hydrated, so storing them whole in the crisper drawer with a wet cloth near them will buy you a week to ten days. If your peppers aren't ripe yet, you can store them at about 70 degrees and they will ripen-but be patient! The process can take up to two weeks. After cooking them, place your leftovers in an air-tight container for about three days in your fridge.


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